George Bodarky

President

George Bodarky is the News and Public Affairs Director at WFUV FM, an NPR affiliate station, based on the Rose Hill campus of Fordham University in the Bronx.  George serves as the Training Committee Chair for Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and is the Past President of the New York State Associated Press Board of Directors.  He is an award-winning journalist who trains undergraduate and graduate students at Fordham University in multi-platform journalism.  George is widely known for his vocal coaching and journalism training.  Over the years his students have won countless awards and have secured employment as anchors, reporters, writers and producers in commercial and public television and radio outlets across the nation.  Prior to working at WFUV, George spent many years as an anchor, reporter and news manager in commercial radio and television.

Ways to Connect

The 2016 conference to take place June 24-25 in St. Louis will draw more than 100 public media news managers from all across the country, as well as network and station-based editors, reporters, producers, and leaders. For many, it will be the only conference they attend this year. If you want to make an impression on them, the PRNDI conference is the place to do it! 

Check out the rate sheet and contact George Bodarky about sponsorship opportunities, gbodarky@wfuv.org

HeatherLWilliams / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Gone are the days of radio as, well, just radio.  

Audiences are engaging with content across a multitude of platforms, and public “radio” newsrooms are doing far more than just producing for broadcast. In today’s ever-changing media landscape, innovation and collaboration are key to engaging with new and younger audiences. Public radio newsrooms across the nation are forging unique partnerships, and creating and distributing stories in ways we never would have imagined even just 10 years ago. Radio newsrooms are producing video for the web and social media, and developing programs that sometimes never even broadcast on a radio frequency.

The bottom line: as the media have evolved so have our newsrooms.

That said, we believe it’s time to consider a name change for Public Radio News Directors, Incorporated, a.k.a. PRNDI.

Join us to discuss the proposed name change Thursday, June 9, at 2:30 p.m. EST. Log on to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7795435561073409027.

'Tis the season for journalism awards contests, but before you submit those entries, join us for a webinar offering hints and tips on how to pick submissions that shine.

Download the complete 2015 Annual Report

Strategic Planning

Each year the PRNDI board holds a retreat to plan the annual conference and set the organization’s goals for the year ahead. Among the initiatives in the works (or already achieved) as a result of that meeting are:

Join PRNDI, AIR, and KUT for a webinar on taking your newsroom into your community with Localore: Finding America.

What’s in A Name?

Apr 20, 2015

Now that radio is, well, no longer just radio, what does that mean for the future of Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI)? I’m not talking about the future of PRNDI as a journalistic organization — that I’m confident is not in doubt — but just what the group is called. In an age where our newsrooms are doing much more than what we broadcast over the air, does “radio” still have a place in our title?

Media Guru Sree Sreenivasan shares tricks of the trade.

As stations reach for a greater share of the audience, we’ll need to hear from a bigger swath of the community. Getting these new, more diverse voices on the air and online can be tough. In this webinar, we’ll take a look at a major sourcing project underway at NPR and share the 7 top ideas that come from stations and the network, all aimed at helping public radio look and sound more like America. Our presenters are Keith Woods, NPR's Vice President for Diversity in News and Operations and Luis Clemens, NPR's Senior Editor for Diversity.

Watch a recording of the webinar here.

The PRNDI Board is pleased to announce the 2015 recipient of the Leo C. Lee award. 

The name of this year’s winner is synonymous with public radio. Tanya Ott’s contributions to the industry are many-fold. 

Death by Chocolate

Nov 26, 2014
This dessert nearly killed the PRNDI Board.
Amy Jeffries

Food and public radio go hand in hand. 

Fund drives, in particular, provide a constant flow of delectable edibles. Anytime a drive rolls around at my station, I don’t have to grocery show for a week. And then there are election nights. Who among us hasn’t bonded with others in our newsrooms over a cold slice of pizza or a hoagie?

Bonding over food also extends to PRNDI Board retreats. For the past couple of years the board has rented a house for our retreats, and we share cooking responsibilities. I especially like to fuel our meetings with this sweet treat. So I topped off our recent meet-up in Salt Lake City with “Death by Chocolate.”

No board members were harmed in the making of this dessert.

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